Themes in novel writing

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Genre

Writing under a particular genre ~ romance, crime, mystery, fantasy or historical fiction, for example, is one way of classifying a novel, but what about the underlying themes.

Themes

Common themes are love, death, evil, survival, war, peace, tragedy.

Writersedit.com lists and describes 10 popular themes:

love, death, coming of age, good v evil, courage and heroism, survival, power and corruption, prejudice, individual v society, war

It is an interesting blog because it describes novels within each theme, great when beginning to plan a novel or even to advertise your novel alongside similar themes.

Why is knowing the theme important?

  • When writing the blurb it is useful to incorporate the themes
  • They are key search words for visibility on the internet (Amazon especially)
  • Themes are succinct words for any marketing materials when describing your book
  • They are great to have ready when giving a succinct verbal description if asked, ‘What’s your book about then?’ ~ difficult if you are not prepared and you don’t want to waffle on.

What themes did I chose?

When planning my recent novel, MISSING Past and Present I slipped into these major themes:

  1. Poverty and homelessness
  2. Mixed relationships and multi faith marriage
  3. Prejudice
  4. Gender inequality
  5. Resilience and fortitude

In my last few blog posts I have addressed the first theme, Poverty and Homelessness, describing how working in a soup kitchen ‘cum’ network of support for homeless people inspired my novel in the first place, and so in the next few blog posts I will turn to the second and third themes, which I feel go hand in hand.

3 Comments

Filed under MISSING Past and Present, Writing, Writing a novel

3 responses to “Themes in novel writing

  1. pip2771

    These are really good ideas. I find writing lengthy posts pretty difficult, and struggle for ideas

    • Thanks Pip. I don’t lack ideas ~ just the time to put them all together. I’ve got an interesting set of posts coming up ~ interviews with a few successful Indie Writers. I’m hoping they’ll share some of their secrets!

  2. Pingback: Light Bulb Moment of inspiration ~ Just a Sentence ~ then a Story Plan | Diana Jackson's Muse, Views and Reviews

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