Category Archives: Book reading

Andrew Carnegie Would Turn in his Grave but …

Looking backwards …The father of public libraries, Andrew Carnegie, was born in

carnegie-hall

Carnegie Hall, Dunfermline ~    a theatre

Dunfermline and so it is unfortunate that many libraries in his home county, the Kingdom of Fife, should be closing in 2017. Over 600 libraries opened in the UK in the latter part of the nineteenth century, due to this man’s vision. I believe he will ‘turn in his grave’ at recent events.

After a major campaign, which ceased a year ago, several community groups were determined not to be defeated and took up the mantle to work towards reopening volunteer run facilities when their beloved libraries finally close. One of these groups is in The Royal Burgh of Kinghorn, where I now live.

There is a willingness within the residents of Kinghorn to support this vital campaign, although many organisations already stretch our resources and the resourcefulness of such a community, including the church, the RNLI, the Rotary, Kinghorn in Bloom and I’m sure many more.

The support has been tremendous. Kinghorn Library Renewed have met for for past year to work towards a transitional phase. The passing of our current library will be a sad time for the library users here in Kinghorn and we will all miss Tricia, but with energy we can make KLR work for the people of Kinghorn once more.

I hope that, if Andrew Carnegie is looking on, he appreciates the efforts of groups up and down the county and that, after his initial frustration and possibly anger, I hope he will smile down on us!

I’ll keep you posted but meanwhile here is a link of news from The Fife Cultural Trust regarding the progress of all libraries under threat.

scarecrow

KLR’s contribution to KIB’s scarecrow competition turned a few heads!

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Filed under Book reading, Libraries

Being Energised and Networking

DSCN3324[1]The first UK Indie Literacy Festival was all about being energized by readers and authors and networking with authors so that we can be mutually supportive in the future.

Meeting people, enjoying conversation and selling books to folks is not new to me of course, but it was the first time  that I’d been involved in something on this scale. It was also great to give a short talk, listen to others hold workshops, describe the background to their writing or give readings.

Micheal Wombat brought us to near tears by his short stories. He is a natural story teller and I look forward to reading Warren Peace!~ a cross between Watership Down and Micheal Harwood’s Duncton Woods maybe.

Felicity Snowden whetted our appetite for ghostly, historic happenings as she described the inspiration behind her novel When Dead Men Won’t Lie.

Other books I have on my shelf ready to read are The House on the Shore ~ a romantic thriller by Victoria Howard and Lost Love in Spring by Rose English ~ a book which combines a story, poetry and information about plants and their uses in past times, related to the story.

I was not able to go to all of the talks but those I went to were most enjoyable.

The wonderful thing about Indie fiction is that you can enjoy an eclectic mix of genre between the covers of a single novel. Delightfully refreshing!

 

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Filed under Book reading, Events

Introducing Rose English ~ Author of One Breath

160501 May Day 29

Rose English is also hard at work preparing for the UKIndieLitFest 2016.

A perfect name for an author who lives in the heart of England in Herefordshire, which speaks to me of apple orchards, cows grazing in the meadows flanked by a backdrop of the hills and mountains of the Welsh borders.

Her writing is beautifully crafted, moving and sends tingles down your spine. Here is my review of ‘One Breath:

One Breath by Rose English

This short story takes your breath away – literally. When you read it make sure you find a quiet spot ~ in the garden would be perfect ~ but certainly one where you will not be disturbed for half an hour. I’ve read it twice already.

Beautifully written, it tells the story of Dorothy, or Dotty as her ever loving husband Albert likes to call her ~ oh, what can I say without spoiling the story for you. This is a tale of love and tragedy and you will probably shed a tear or two, out of joy as well as pain. Dotty has a love for her garden, in which lies the symbolism of all that is significant in her life, including a rose to commemorate her ‘almost’ still born baby, Grace.

There is humour, fantasy and emotion woven through this tale, which won second prize in an online competition via ‘The Daily Bookworm’.  I hope that Rose English will go on to write novels and I believe her name will be one to watch out for in future years.

What more can I say but to wish her well in her writing and I promise to read  ‘The Magic of grandfather Time’ next Christmas. I will certainly buy a signed copy and I look forward to meeting Rose English at the UK Indie Lit Festival on 23rd July in Bradford.

Rose English’s website

Twitter @RoseEnglishUK

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Events, Guest author, Marketing your novel, Writing