Category Archives: Book reviews

I’m excited to share with you a Scottish Poet ~ Pauline Prior – Pitt

Having just returned from a memorable trip to the Outer Hebrides ~ the island of Barra via Oban, then on to South Uist and back from Lochboisdale to Mallaig ~ I am excited to share with you Pauline Prior – Pitt.

South Uist

I bought ‘be an angel’ in the new Kildonan Centre. This is an interesting and thoughtfully displayed museum, where you could while away a morning reading the detailed boards alongside displays of artifacts and memorabilia. There’s a coffee shop for fresh lunches, soup, cakes, scones or just tea or coffee and also a local arts and crafts shop, where I bought ‘be an angel’.

I leafed through a couple of poems in the shop and was struck immediately by the notions ‘Pauline knows me personally! How did she know that? She has an amazing ability to describe, word for word, what goes on in my home, my relationships and in the depths of my mind in such a succinct but powerful way. There are some surprises however and twists at the end. Pauline seems to grip the heart of every conceivable human emotion ~ especially women’s.

I cannot quote a poem in case of infringing copyright but some of the titles may give you a taste of Pauline Prior-Pitt’s humour, as well as her understanding of humanity:

Leaving South Uist

be an angel, amnesia, sisterhood, together, crumbs, company of women, just, and when, a woman’s prayer …

‘be an angel’ is a collection of Pauline Prior Pitt’s poems inspired by the lives of women. Click on the link to go through to the publishers, Longstone Books. It does not appear to be available on Amazon.

If you love poetry, but also wish to have a flavour of life in the Outer Hebrides, (Pauline was born in North Uist) then I highly recommend this book.

Maureen Lipman says:

‘Everyone needs a Pauline Prior-Pitt in their lives and on their bookshelves.’

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Scotland, Scottish authors

Karma Lawyer: Courage and Love by Nigel Lesmoir Gordon

Maitland Fairweather is rich, successful, ruthless and good looking ~ but pretty cheesed off. He has discovered that his wife Sarah, of only a year, is having an affair. He decides to arrange to have her murdered without trace by a hit squad of three women.

This gripping tale is of Maitland, an unscrupulous lawyer of repute, struggling with his conscience as he covers his tracks and begins to build a new life. Falling in love with Mary, a whistleblower in a case he’s working on of a possibly corrupt scientific research company Scalar Electronics, creates further complications as he continues to dodge retribution.

The author Nigel Lesmoir Gordon has many messages to relay to us in this novel and as I reader I was not sure whether these asides were sometimes cleverly disguised fiction too.

Karma Lawyer is bitter sweet. I had empathy for Maitland even though I felt instinctively that I shouldn’t. I wanted Mary to see through his omissions of the truth and yet a small part of me wanted the relationship to work, softened by their genuine rapport and Mary’s good nature.

Karma Lawyer is an unusual novel and is well worth reading. It would make an excellent choice for a book group. I could imagine the heated arguments that it might provoke!

I wish Nigel every good fortune with this novel.

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Reading a novel

The Glass Knight by Julia Colbourn

The Glass Knight by Julia Colbourn

The stage is set for The Glass Knight at a time a few decades after a world apocalypse. The small surviving communities struggle to maintain a civilised world. Andelantos, for example, forbids guns and any forms of communication from the old world, trying to learn from past mistakes.

Saffy excels in everything from science to sport. It was while she attempted a serious climbing expedition with a friend Varney, not her equal in any way, that they are captured by two fugitives, James and Raife and taken hostage. They are dragged, or at least Saffy is, to a refuge where a religious sect called the Joules live. On the way Raife and Varney fall in love and Saffy and James begin a psychological battle against a mutual attraction  of equals.

The Glass Knight had me hooked form the start even though Sci Fi is not a genre I usually choose.

Would the legend of the Glass Knight come true?

Would Saffy overcome the blot on her life, the lack of bonding with her father?

How could Saffy and the equally strong willed Malvern (his real name) resolve their differences and cope with the unwanted magnetic attraction they both feel?

The twists and turns in the plot were ingenious. The characterisation was beautifully crafted and the scene set in full technicolour, including vampire like creatures and other ‘out of this world’ predators.

A great book, highly recommended! Brilliant cover too.

I met Julia on holiday ~ wonderful to share a common interest and even better to read one of her books.

 

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Reading a novel