Category Archives: Reading a novel

Karma Lawyer: Courage and Love by Nigel Lesmoir Gordon

Maitland Fairweather is rich, successful, ruthless and good looking ~ but pretty cheesed off. He has discovered that his wife Sarah, of only a year, is having an affair. He decides to arrange to have her murdered without trace by a hit squad of three women.

This gripping tale is of Maitland, an unscrupulous lawyer of repute, struggling with his conscience as he covers his tracks and begins to build a new life. Falling in love with Mary, a whistleblower in a case he’s working on of a possibly corrupt scientific research company Scalar Electronics, creates further complications as he continues to dodge retribution.

The author Nigel Lesmoir Gordon has many messages to relay to us in this novel and as I reader I was not sure whether these asides were sometimes cleverly disguised fiction too.

Karma Lawyer is bitter sweet. I had empathy for Maitland even though I felt instinctively that I shouldn’t. I wanted Mary to see through his omissions of the truth and yet a small part of me wanted the relationship to work, softened by their genuine rapport and Mary’s good nature.

Karma Lawyer is an unusual novel and is well worth reading. It would make an excellent choice for a book group. I could imagine the heated arguments that it might provoke!

I wish Nigel every good fortune with this novel.

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The Glass Knight by Julia Colbourn

The Glass Knight by Julia Colbourn

The stage is set for The Glass Knight at a time a few decades after a world apocalypse. The small surviving communities struggle to maintain a civilised world. Andelantos, for example, forbids guns and any forms of communication from the old world, trying to learn from past mistakes.

Saffy excels in everything from science to sport. It was while she attempted a serious climbing expedition with a friend Varney, not her equal in any way, that they are captured by two fugitives, James and Raife and taken hostage. They are dragged, or at least Saffy is, to a refuge where a religious sect called the Joules live. On the way Raife and Varney fall in love and Saffy and James begin a psychological battle against a mutual attraction  of equals.

The Glass Knight had me hooked form the start even though Sci Fi is not a genre I usually choose.

Would the legend of the Glass Knight come true?

Would Saffy overcome the blot on her life, the lack of bonding with her father?

How could Saffy and the equally strong willed Malvern (his real name) resolve their differences and cope with the unwanted magnetic attraction they both feel?

The twists and turns in the plot were ingenious. The characterisation was beautifully crafted and the scene set in full technicolour, including vampire like creatures and other ‘out of this world’ predators.

A great book, highly recommended! Brilliant cover too.

I met Julia on holiday ~ wonderful to share a common interest and even better to read one of her books.

 

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A Salt Splashed Cradle by Chris Longmuir

I met Chris in the craft tent at Glamis Castle Vehicle Extravaganza and after a chat I bought a signed copy of this book.

It was a thoroughly enjoyable read, all the more so because I am gradually exploring Scotland and will be heading to Montrose in a few weeks.

Chris’s colourful description of the fisherfolk, especially the women, quickly draws the reader into this close knit community and and encourages empathy for Belle, the outsider, who neither fits in due to her looks and build or her manner and expectations of life. The fear is palpable as she is lured into circumstances which could lead to her downfall when the women turn totally against her. Her saviour comes from the most unexpected source and the novel leaves you wondering what Belle will do next.

The relationships in A Salt Splashed Cradle are complex as they are simple. The reader grapples with the trauma of Belle’s daughter Sarah, the strong mother in law and Matriach Annie, as much as with Belle herself. The sea is never far away, with its dangers, both fishing in local waters and further afield as Belle’s husband Jimmie heads off to the far north in a whaling ship.

A well crafted novel and a pleasure to read.

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Historical Fiction, Reading a novel, Scotland, Scottish authors