Category Archives: Reading a novel

Author Roderick Hart takes up the ‘Throw a Dice Challenge’

I’m really pleased to welcome author Roderick Hart who is taking part in my

‘Throw a Dice Challenge’

Please can you share your author bio:

 

Roderick Hart

has published poetry in anthologies of verse, made bubble gum in Philadelphia, studied folk music in Afghanistan, and worked for many years in a recording studio, training students in scripting, recording and editing. He lives with his wife in the grounds of an old convent in Edinburgh.

TELL US A BIT ABOUT ONE OF YOUR CHARACTERS ROD

Louise Galbraith is a lawyer in my novel, Interleaved Lives. She is first asked to defend her wealthy friend, Alison Ogilvie, who is accused of arranging the death of her husband. She is later persuaded, against her better judgement, to defend the main character, Douglas Hunter, a private detective employed by Alison Ogilvie to investigate the real cause of her husband’s death.

I am part way through Interleaved Lives and believe that I am just about to meet Louise Galbraith, so this is really interesting for me:

Now can you reveal more about Louise by sharing some of her memories?

We throw a dice. One is the most tragic or horrific memory to a six which is the most fantastic or beautiful memory. Here goes:

 

Memory 1

Louise is described by her friend Alison, as career-oriented, with no family of her own but two nieces kindly provided be her sister.

Memory 2

When Douglas Hunter first meets Louise she is wearing a t-shirt bearing words which typify her in-your-face approach: SEE YOU IN COURT

Memory 3

When defending Alison against police accusations, Hunter finds she is also defending her against him, at first on grounds of conflict of interest and later because she believes that Hunter is after Alison’s money.

Memory 4

On arriving at the police station to represent Hunter, Louise is outraged by DS MacNeil’s attitude, which stops in her tracks – but the tassels on her ethnic headgear don’t stop with her, a comic effect at odds with her ability.

Memory 5

At first misled by Louise Galbraith’s shambolic appearance, it gradually dawns on DS MacNeil that Louise Galbraith is much sharper than she looks.

Memory 6

As Hunter is being interviewed, very aggressively, by DS MacNeil, Louise notices something about MacNeil which Hunter, though a detective, has failed top pick up.

Click photo for Amazon.co.uk

 

 

Now I really am intrigued! I must say that I’m really enjoying ‘Interleaved Lives’ so far and hope to review it for readers soon. 

JUST RLEASED!

Interleaved Lives by Roderick Hart is a crime novel with the protagonist a private detective, ex policeman living in Edinburgh, a city the author knows well.

I wish Rod well deserved success with this novel which has just been released in e book format worldwide!

 

 

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Filed under Book reading, Events, Guest author, Marketing your novel, Reading a novel, Scotland

Author David Ebsworth takes up the ‘Throw a Dice Challenge!’

I’m really pleased to welcome author David Ebsworth who is taking part in my

‘Throw a Dice Challenge’

David Ebsworth’s latest and ninth novel is the final part of the Yale Trilogy about a 17th century nabob philanthropist and slave trader  Elihu Yale, but it is told through the eyes of Yale’s wife, Catherine. David was inspired to write the series when he came across a copy of Yale’s will, with the memorable line: “To my wicked wife…” And then, nothing. No bequest. Not even her name.

                    Click for Amazon UK

Tell us a bit about one of your characters David:

In the year 1728, Catherine Hynmers Yale is in her seventy-seventh year. She has wealth derived from her long association with the English East India Company and she has tragically outlived all but two of her nine children. Yet now she knows there are few days left to her. 

What an exciting period in history David but very controversial in today’s world. Now can you reveal more about Catherine by sharing some of her memories?

 

 

We throw a dice. One is the most tragic or horrific memory to a six which is the most fantastic or beautiful memory:

 
One: The horrific death of her third-born, little Walter, at the East India Company’s outpost in Madras, and the endless nightmare that the babe may have been buried alive.
 
Two: The loss, when she was still a small girl, of all the family possessed – including her father’s coffee house in London’s Great Fire, and the destitution that followed.
 
Three: The multiple betrayals, in her later life, that led to her brutal incarceration in the Bethlem Hospital.
Four: Her joyous return, in 1689, to a London rebuilt, and her reunion with her family.
 
Five: The birth of her first-born in 1670, and the mantras taught to her by her Hindu friend and mentor, Sathiri – the power of which have served her through all her subsequent trials.
Six: After the comfort of her first marriage to Joseph Hynmers, and the disaster of her second to Elihu Yale, there has been the magic of the passion she once shared with Matthew Parrish.

Here’s More About the author and his writing

David Ebsworth was born in Liverpool but has lived in Wrexham, North Wales, for the past 40 years. He began writing full-time after he retired in 2008.

David Ebsworth’s stories – often with strong female protagonists – cover the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745, the Spanish Civil War, Zululand in 1879, the Napoleonic Hundred Days of 1815 and 6th Century Romano-Celtic Britain.

The first part of the Yale Trilogy, The Doubtful Diaries of Wicked Mistress Yale, follows Catherine’s early misadventures at the East India Company outpost in old Madras …

while the second, Mistress Yale’s Diaries, The Glorious Return, sees her back in London with her children during the 1690s and embroiled in all the turmoil and intrigue following the Glorious Revolution.

But now, the third and final part – Wicked Mistress Yale, The Parting Glass:1700 and East India Company Governor Elihu Yale is back in London, seemingly intent on reconciliation with his wife Catherine after ten years of separation. But those ten years have given her a taste of independence that she’s not ready to easily surrender. The ghosts of her previous life continue to haunt her, however – yet another former foe returned with her husband and seemingly is still intent on revenge. A more evil enemy still, in the shape of that Jacobite Colonel John Porter, who had caused such damage to her youngest daughter. Drawn back even further into espionage on behalf of her nation, Catherine must battle madness, her desires, the rifts in her family, riot, rebellion and assassination in this tumultuous third and final act of the Yale Trilogy.

David’s special offer:

I’m currently offering a free kindle copy of the first part, The Doubtful Diaries of Wicked Mistress Yale, to anybody who might be interested in reading it and, if they like it, possibly posting a short review on Amazon, Goodreads etc. All I need is their kindle e-mail address and to let me know whether they’re in the UK, USA, etc. But don’t worry about that bit if it’s a nuisance.

Best regards

David Ebsworth ~ Writer of historical fiction

_Out now – Part Three of the Yale Trilogy.

“Shades of James Clavell’s  Shogun and Winston Graham’s  Poldark.”

All three parts available through normal outlets.

http://www.davidebsworth.com/doubtful-diaries-wicked-mistress-yale

http://www.davidebsworth.com/mistress-yales-diaries-glorious-return

Thanks for taking part in my ‘Dice of Memories Challenge’ David. 

Diana Jackson is author of Mystery Inspired by History Series
the protagonist of her latest novel
‘MISSING Past and Present ~ Is Life Just a Roll of a Dice’
rolls a dice to relive her memories. 

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Filed under Book reading, Events, Guest author, Historical Fiction, Marketing your novel, Reading a novel

Adam Croft ~ 1st of my Summer Special Interviews of Successful Indie Authors

             Author Adam Croft

I’m so pleased to be fortunate to have this interview with author Adam Croft, which is aimed to appeal to writers, fans and potential readers alike. Adam is a successful Indie Author of Crime Fiction who has sold over 1 million novels worldwide.

Hello Adam,

Do you mind me asking, was the success in your writing career a gradual process or very sudden?

A bit of both. I hammered away for five years before I saw any meaningful success. Things seem to come in spikes in this industry. There’s no gradual increase or visible progression — it all seems to happen very much behind the scenes, and then plays ‘catch up’ all of a sudden.

Are you single minded in your writing? Do you treat it as your main work and plan your day accordingly or write when the mood takes you?

I’m absolutely single-minded with it — as I am with most things! As far as I see it, this is my job. I’m very fortunate to be able to do it, so I give it the respect it deserves and treat it much like any other job. I’m usually in the office around seven in the morning and am often here until ten o’clock at night. I also employ three other people to help take care of everything else so I’m free to focus on writing, media engagements, responding to readers and all the other things that can only really be done by me.

You would call your main genre Mystery? Wouldn’t you? How would you describe your writing style to potential readers?

I think I’d probably call it Crime. A couple of my books are mysteries, but most are police procedurals or psychological thrillers. Generally speaking, readers say the books are fast-paced, aren’t filled with inane waffle like what the character had for breakfast (even if it is waffles) and drag people straight into the story. I have a short attention span myself, so I write the books I’d want to read. I think that’s a good rule of thumb for any writer.

I think the last book I read of yours was a mystery. I’ll have to check out your new ones …

Can you give fellow writers any marketing tips?

Marketing isn’t something it’s easy to give tips about, because it’s entirely dependent on the writer and their books. In general, I’d say know your market. That’s not just ‘readers’ or even ‘women over 60 who read’, for example. Who is this woman? What’s her name? Where does she live? What does she do? How does she speak? Find your tribe. Most of all, stand out from the crowd. Too many people look at what others are doing successfully and think that must be ‘the right way’. It might be for that author, but it most likely won’t be for you. Experiment, find what works for you. And keep at it. It’s not a button you push — it’s years of concerted effort and hard work.

Very good advice Adam …

Have you one annoying habit you can share with us?

I’d probably have to ask my wife that one…

What pastimes keep your feet on the ground, or maybe not, when you aren’t writing?

I genuinely don’t get much time to myself, so I tend to try to escape to the pub where possible. That way, I’m out of the house and physically unable to work or worry about work. It’s also a great social environment that allows me to people-watch and, of course, all writers like a drink or twelve.

Was there a single moment in your writing life when you thought ‘YES, THIS IS IT’? Can you describe that moment for us?

Honestly, no. There’ve been many moments where I’ve been incredibly proud and happy with where e I am — Hitting number 1 spots, knocking JK Rowling into second place as the most widely-read author in the world for a few hours according to Amazon, being awarded an Honorary Doctorate for ‘services to literature’ (I know — hardly literature in my case). They’re all great, but I genuinely never feel I’ve actually achieved anything, or at least haven’t achieved what I’m meant to achieve. Maybe that’s what keeps me going and pushes me forward. If I don’t know what I’m aiming for, I’ll never feel the journey’s over.

Hey Adam, that’s a good few exciting wow moments …

We’d love to hear your latest news:

I’ve got a new book out on 28th July, called WHAT LIES BENEATH. It’s the first in the new Rutland crime series and has had an absolutely incredible reception in Rutland. I’m already working on the second — ON BORROWED TIME — which comes out in September. It’s been odd going the ‘old school’ route with this series. It’s very locally-focused, so many of the sales are through local retailers and bookshops. It’s extremely paperback-heavy for me, too. But it’s been incredible. That face-to-face, one-to-one contact is something you can’t replicate with an Amazon report.

And finally, do you see yourself writing in five years time and have you ever been tempted to write in a different genre to surprise your readers?

I’ll either be writing or dead. That can be said for pretty much any point in the future, to be honest. I’ve also written plays and had them performed, although they’re VERY different to my books. They’re either super-commercial farces with predictable plots and jokes (but which get snapped up quickly) or are quite avant-garde and surrealist, often verging on Dadaist in their style. Definitely not murder mysteries or police procedurals. I have been tempted by a genre change, but I’m not sure how I’d manage it. I’ve got ideas for other things and am keen to get them done, but I’m not sure when or under which name.

We all hope you are very much alive in five years and still writing prolifically …

Here are a few links to find Adam and his books on the internet:

Adam Croft’s Amazon.co.uk Author Page

Adam Croft’s Amazon.com Author Page

Adam Croft’s website

Adam, thank you so much for being honest with us about your writing. So many points to mull over for authors. I’m a little in awe of all that you have achieved since we met years ago in that little Ampthill bookshop, to be honest with you. It’s nice to know that you still have time for small bookshops and meeting your audience, as well as a pint or two in the pub. I can see you now in my minds eye… 

Good luck with your new series too!

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