Category Archives: Woolston

Festive Christmas Deal ~99Cents 14th-20th December!

Ancasta Guide me Swiftly Home, historical fiction set between 1910 and 1920 in

Ancasta Guide me Swiftly Home

Ancasta Guide me Swiftly Home

Southampton, the Solent area and The Channel Islands is 99Cents  for one week only on KINDLE.

~A HEARTFELT READ ~ L Simms Top 100 Reviewer!

          ~VERY ENJOYABLE BOOK~

                      ~ STRONG HISTORICAL NARRATIVE ~

~CHARACTERS DESCRIBED SO VIVIDLY~

Original Aspects of WW1

I was thrilled to receive my latest 5* review on Amazon.com:

I don’t normally read historical fiction, but I’m glad I took the leap with Ancasta. The passion and knowledge the writer possesses flows through the pages, and Ancasta probably has the best background research and world view of any book that I’ve read. A thoroughly enjoyable read, which took me to a place and time completely unknown to me, until now!”

MH84 ~ Please say hello by email sometime. I’d love to say thank you. You have made my day with your encouragement!

OR… A LAST MINUTE CHRISTMAS GIFT

Ancasta Guide me Swiftly Home would also make a great last minute Christmas gift in paperback too for anyone interested in

Historical Fiction

                                    The Great War and the role of Women

                                                                                                             Early Flying Boat

History of Southampton and Woolston

                                                                      a lover of Guernsey or Alderney………

Available in Waterstones West Quay, Southampton or on Amazon

Although the second in The Riduna Series Ancasta is written to stand alone!

and if you read it I would be truly grateful if you could give an honest review on Amazon, Goodreads or both. Please spread the word……………..RT or SHARE…….

Have a wonderful Christmas everyone!

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Filed under Book reviews, Book Shops, Channel Islands, Events, Flying Boats and Sea Planes, Historical Fiction, Southampton, The Great War, Woolston

Another 5* Review ~ A Balance of Perspectives

I would like to celebrate with you two new 5* reviews on Amazon this week, the first for Riduna (the island of Alderney, Channel Islands):

Riduna

Riduna

“I read this book as the precursor to Ancasta to ensure I understood the characters and settings, and I’m pleased that I did. The author paints an engaging picture of life on the island of 150 years ago, aspects of which I could relate to my own early years. The story tells the timeless dramas of life’s progress spanning many years against this fascinating background, and is very readable – you really feel you get to know the characters and the island.”

 

 

 

 

The reader continues in his praise of Ancasta:

Ancasta Guide me Swiftly Home

Ancasta Guide me Swiftly Home

 

“The Riduna story develops dramatically as it shifts its location to Itchen Ferry Village, Southampton, straddling the years of WWI. We move from small island life to the world stage. I know this area well, and have stepped in the footprints of the characters. There is a rich wealth of detail encompassing the incredible events of this period, and the author has researched well, but kept the historical aspects in context with the central characters. Most enjoyable, and I very much look forward to the next in the series!”

Do I know this kind and thoughtful reader you may ask? Is he a friend or long lost relation? No, he first emailed me saying he’d bought the books when searching for the telephone number of The Yacht Tavern in Itchen Ferry village (most say Woolston unless you live there, where the people are very particular to differentiate and always have done, rightly so) I have met him subsequently. Following a successful book signing session at West Quay Waterstones Southampton I took my parents to the Yacht for lunch and I signed the gentleman’s books and had a lovely chat.

I particularly liked the way he talked of walking in the footsteps of the characters and several people, who have written emails to me after borrowed the books from local libraries down in Hampshire, said much the same thing.

Other positive reviews recently received recently were from a reading group in Luton, Bedfordshire and yet again I knew none of them (I am writing this for the writers among you) The feedback was that all enjoyed the book although it was not a genre they would normally pick up to read, preferring thrillers and murder mysteries. I was so grateful for their feedback because firstly they had not read the first in the series Riduna and secondly they lived no where near the settings of the novel and so I was assured that their unfamiliarity did not diminish their enjoyment of Ancasta.

Having said all of this I do appreciate any feedback, especially from writers who will point out the finer details. I can learn much from their feedback which will enable me to refine my craft for future writing. I always ask readers and writers for their honest opinions, as I hope I would give myself.

If you have read either of my books and would like to let me know what you think, but would rather email me  here’s the address: 

diana@dianamaryjackson.co.uk

I look forward to hearing from you.

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Filed under Ancasta, Book reading, Book reviews, Riduna, Woolston

John Shelton ~ Author of ‘Schneider Trophy to Spitfire’

Today I’m thrilled to have been in contact with John Shelton, the author of’Schneider Trophy to Spitfire,’ an excellent book I reviewed on an earlier post last year. In fact John got in touch with me following that post and has agreed to share with us some background information about his life and how he became interested in Supermarine. John writes:

Schneider Trophy to Spitfire by John Shelton

Schneider Trophy to Spitfire by John Shelton

‘I got as far as a Ph.D in Literature but began to tire of writing or talking about fiction. Renovating an Elizabethan manor house began to consume most of my time and energy and the solving of practical problems became more interesting – real things rather than imagined people. Like R.J., I had a

schoolboy interest in flying model aeroplanes and was soon drawing my own constructional plans (hence my 3-view drawings of Mitchell’s aircraft in my book).

On a chance visit to the Stoke Museum, I discovered that their Spitfire was to be re-housed, accompanied by a display. I volunteered to write the text for this display and was surprised to discover that Mitchell had begun designing aeroplanes for Supermarine as early as the 1920’s.

So, on retirement, I decided to write a full account of his aircraft as, again to my surprise, I found that there was only one book which related directly to his work and this was a sketchy and a rather amateur affair.

The above display activity had been given considerable help by the Solent-Sky Museum at Southampton and I was also encouraged in my later efforts by its Director, Sqn. Ldr. Alan Jones: “the book we’ve all been waiting for”.

I too felt that Mitchell deserved a dedicated account of his work, if only to show how the Spitfire came about – there are countless books about his famous fighter but no apparent interest in the man and how he had reached this design peak. There was also the surprising fact (to me as to most everyone else) that a man from the landlocked Midlands should design almost exclusively flying-boats, was virtually self-taught, and achieved success in his field at a very early age.

Being no stranger to writing extended studies, I felt I could do a reasonable job of collecting material (see my Bibliography) and of putting it together; and as I had also taught Communication as well as Industrial Archaeology, I hoped that I would be able to make a relatively technical story readable. Also, by this time, I had soloed in gliders and powered aircraft and so felt that I might have an insight into what the pioneers of flying had learned and were still learning about exploiting their new element.

Fortunately there were quite a number of books which had things to say about Mitchell’s aircraft and not a few by pilots who had flown them. These, and items scattered throughout other aviation literature, also provided many anecdotes about Mitchell which deserved collecting together as they became out of print or forgotten on dusty shelves. It was therefore very good news when Haynes Publishers accepted my MS, which – it has to be said – concentrated more on the machines than on the man: after all, they were the primary reason for an interest in the man and, as his reputation was only widely known after his death, no-one had thought beforehand to leave detailed information about  his life-story for future biographers.

Given the lack of any full accounts of Mitchell’s life, but also needing to correct his portrayal in the First of the Few film, I tried to steer a course between the known facts about his life and his designs; and, true to my early career, my book had a thesis – which was to trace the vital influence of the Schneider Trophy competitions upon the eventual production of the Spitfire.

Since the publication of Schneider Trophy to Spitfire, I have continued my interest in most things Mitchell and hope therefore that  an extended second edition might be eventually published. Meanwhile, my Blogs are a useful outlet for mature thoughts about the man and his designs as well as a device to keep his name before the general public.’

I would like to thank John for sharing the background to his writing. It’s fascinating looking back at the course of our lives and where it has taken us. John continues to write detailed and interesting posts about R.J.Mitchell and his designs on his own blog:

johnshelton.blogspot.co.uk

I wish him the best of luck with future projects. John’s book helped me enormously when researching for Ancasta and I still use it as a reference to check facts whilst researching for the next in my series.

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Filed under Early Flight, Flying Boats and Sea Planes, Southampton, Supermarine, Woolston