Tag Archives: Historical Fiction

Am I crazy? Probably. — Margaret Skea, Author writes …

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Fortitude is out – has been for over 2 weeks now – with a slightly different start to my usual, as the print version is currently only available from Amazon, though I will be doing a print run with my UK printer shortly. Why POD just now? Because I have taken the ‘head staggers’ and […]

via Am I crazy? Probably. — Margaret Skea, Author

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August 19, 2019 · 12:08 pm

A Salt Splashed Cradle by Chris Longmuir

I met Chris in the craft tent at Glamis Castle Vehicle Extravaganza and after a chat I bought a signed copy of this book.

It was a thoroughly enjoyable read, all the more so because I am gradually exploring Scotland and will be heading to Montrose in a few weeks.

Chris’s colourful description of the fisherfolk, especially the women, quickly draws the reader into this close knit community and and encourages empathy for Belle, the outsider, who neither fits in due to her looks and build or her manner and expectations of life. The fear is palpable as she is lured into circumstances which could lead to her downfall when the women turn totally against her. Her saviour comes from the most unexpected source and the novel leaves you wondering what Belle will do next.

The relationships in A Salt Splashed Cradle are complex as they are simple. The reader grapples with the trauma of Belle’s daughter Sarah, the strong mother in law and Matriach Annie, as much as with Belle herself. The sea is never far away, with its dangers, both fishing in local waters and further afield as Belle’s husband Jimmie heads off to the far north in a whaling ship.

A well crafted novel and a pleasure to read.

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Historical Fiction, Reading a novel, Scotland, Scottish authors

Scottish Author ~ Book Review ~ The Queen’s Grace by Nigel Tranter

I was introduced to the works of Nigel Tranter when discussing Scottish Literature with Alex at The Wee Shoppe in Kinghorn; if fact I borrowed several of Nigel Tranter’s books from Alex.

41GVH5TMS3L._AC_US218_The Queen’s Grace, is but one of those books, which I have recently reread. Tranter was proficient in the skill of weaving credible and nail biting tales around known facts. His novels were always well researched but also so eloquent that they draw us, the readers, back in time as if we were there. This novel is set at the time of Mary Queen of Scots when she was all but captive by her brother, James who plots for her throne. Clansmen swear their allegiance to their Queen but change sides the moment they feel it is prudent to do so. Men’s heads are cut off for crimes they have not committed and yet their honour is their bond.

Alongside these, sometime gruesome scenes are moments of warmth, tenderness and even humour, especially with those surrounding the queen herself. Her loyal subject Patrick Mac Ruary shines throughout the novel and is the constant to the end; his romance with Mary Mackintosh adding a wonderfully human touch, which I enjoyed greatly.

Not only was this an excellent book but it is a wonderful introduction to the intrigues and intricacies of Scottish history, its battles, victories and failures. What a proud nation, justly so, and it has helped me to understand the fractious, almost love – hate relationship between the Scots and the English at times to this day.

The Queens Grace was originally published in 1953 but this edition was reprinted by B & W Publishing House in 1996. It is the first of Tranter’s novels which I have reread, but I doubt if it will be the last.

I met Nigel Tranter on my walk along the Fife Coastal Path and enjoyed a wonderful conversation with him in The Healing Paths of Fife.

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Scotland, Scottish authors, The Healing Paths of Fife, Uncategorized