Tag Archives: Scottish author

I’m excited to share with you a Scottish Poet ~ Pauline Prior – Pitt

Having just returned from a memorable trip to the Outer Hebrides ~ the island of Barra via Oban, then on to South Uist and back from Lochboisdale to Mallaig ~ I am excited to share with you Pauline Prior – Pitt.

South Uist

I bought ‘be an angel’ in the new Kildonan Centre. This is an interesting and thoughtfully displayed museum, where you could while away a morning reading the detailed boards alongside displays of artifacts and memorabilia. There’s a coffee shop for fresh lunches, soup, cakes, scones or just tea or coffee and also a local arts and crafts shop, where I bought ‘be an angel’.

I leafed through a couple of poems in the shop and was struck immediately by the notions ‘Pauline knows me personally! How did she know that? She has an amazing ability to describe, word for word, what goes on in my home, my relationships and in the depths of my mind in such a succinct but powerful way. There are some surprises however and twists at the end. Pauline seems to grip the heart of every conceivable human emotion ~ especially women’s.

I cannot quote a poem in case of infringing copyright but some of the titles may give you a taste of Pauline Prior-Pitt’s humour, as well as her understanding of humanity:

Leaving South Uist

be an angel, amnesia, sisterhood, together, crumbs, company of women, just, and when, a woman’s prayer …

‘be an angel’ is a collection of Pauline Prior Pitt’s poems inspired by the lives of women. Click on the link to go through to the publishers, Longstone Books. It does not appear to be available on Amazon.

If you love poetry, but also wish to have a flavour of life in the Outer Hebrides, (Pauline was born in North Uist) then I highly recommend this book.

Maureen Lipman says:

‘Everyone needs a Pauline Prior-Pitt in their lives and on their bookshelves.’

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Scotland, Scottish authors

Scottish Author Book review ~ A Darker Domain by Val McDermid

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On Amazon

This is a multi layered crime / mystery, with flashbacks to the time of the tumultuous miners’ strike in Fife, as DI Karen Pirie works to solve two seemingly very different cold cases.

Meanwhile Bel Richmond, a freelance journalist, finds a sinister poster and some blood stains in an abandoned villa near where she is staying in Tuscany. This thrusts the lies and deception of the past right into the present as the Italian police begin to investigate. Unraveling the truth has unforeseen and tragic outcomes leaving the reader reeling.

To say that I was gripped by this novel was an understatement, not surprising baring in mind the calibre of the author.

‘A Darker Domain’ was all the more meaningful for me since the Fife coastal locations were now so familiar. Not only that but the social historical aspect of the miners’ dispute added a realistic dimension to the events. Tension was literally in the air – provocation to carry out a kidnapping which led to dire consequences.

I would never have guessed the end of the novel ~ a tragedy of Shakespearean proportions.

I’ve recommended it to a couple of friends already and will read the first in the series. ‘The Distant Echo’ is now on my list of ‘to read’ books.

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Fife, Scotland, Scottish authors

Scottish Author ~ Book Review ~ Shadows in the Stone by Diane Lyn Mc Gyver

01dlmcgyver-shadows-in-the-stone.jpgAn adult fantasy of dwarfs, elves, half castes and hauflins. A tale of love between adopted daughter and father Corporal Darrow, but also his unexpected unrequited passion for Alaura, a half breed enchantress who aids Darrow in bringing up Isla in Aruam Castle. All is not harmony at the castle as the balance in society between peoples is undermined by evil forces.

The pivotal moment is when Isla is kidnapped by her natural father, a vagabond and thief. Taking leave of his post at the castle, Darrow sets off on the long and tumultuous journey in search of Isla, who he feels is his own.

This was quite a different novel to my recent reads but none the less enjoyable; gripping at times. There is a lesson about a successful society here, of folks of various backgrounds getting on with life, being so quickly destabilized.

Most enjoyable and I look forward to Diane Lyn Mc Gyver’s sequel.

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Filed under Book reading, Book reviews, Scottish authors