Tag Archives: The Healing Paths of Fife

Review, Reflect and Move Forward to 2021 (and a festive Giveaway)

If I knew in December 2019 when I reflected on the previous year what I know now, would I have made different plans and had other aspirations? Who knows!

2020

Early March

               Click cover for link to Amazon

… saw the launch on my second ‘mystery inspired by history’ novel

MISSING Past and Present

at the last social gathering in Kinghorn, a cheerful event held at the Station Gallery.

 

More used to face to face bookish activities rather than on line, I must admit to have struggled with social media this year, having spurts of activity, interspersed with period when I just could not get my head around it.

(Like everyone, being unable to visit my elderly parents was a constant worry; both having dementia but attempting to live independently. It is only when the security rug is swept away that you realise just how much loved ones rely on visits from family)

April/ May

I worked on a little book of encouragement for young people who need direction and a bit of positivity; a project I began a few years back. I hope for it to be released February, March 2021. Watch this space for a cover reveal in the new year. 

June

 

 

Unable to be creative I worked with local ladies in Kinghorn to prepare

‘Kinghorn Lunch Club Social Memories;’

a lovely little book which, among other wonderful ideas, was a much needed morale boost for our elderly folks during the pandemic.

Click on cover for link to Amazon.

 

 

 

July

I actually began to write again, focusing on the sequel to MISSING.

August

With infection rates lower, the highlight of the month was visiting my elderly parents which was a mixture of heart wrenching moments but relief to be with them.

September/ October/ November

Working with fellow Eventispress author Brian Kerr, whose third book 

How to Value a Skylark ~ The Countryside in a Time of Change

will be launched in January 2021.

(meanwhile my parents were hospitalised not with Covid and transferred to a care home, where both are now cared for and safe. I still long to see them but when it is safe to rwsume my regular visits down south ~ the culmination of a very stressful and upsetting time. So hard not to be with them when they needed us most!)

Click on cover for more information about Brian and the book. 

 

Charity Sales

Sales of Kinghorn Lunch Club Memories and The Healing Paths of Fife (currently sold in aid of Kirkcaldy Foodbank which covers Kinghorn, Burntisland and surrounding areas as well as Kirkcaldy) 

£673

has been raised to date!

I would love it to reach £1000 as soon as possible!

On reflection, in the writing world I have some achievements to be cheerful about in 2020.

What do I long for in 2021?

~ First and foremost to see my parents and to spend some quality time with them. Both having dementia, I cannot make up for a whole year lost, but I want to do my utmost to make their lives as pleasurable as I possibly can.

~ Secondly I wish Brian Kerr every success with his new book. 

I’d like to reach my goal of £1000 through the sale of ‘The Healing Paths of Fife’

Yes, of course I would love you all to read ‘MISSING Past and Present’ and with that in mind I am willing to give 10 ebooks away if you’d like to email me ~  dianariduna@yahoo.com

…and finally I’d like to wish you all a safe Christmas,

        …that you’ll be vaccinated soon in 2021

                  …and that you can be reunited with your loved ones as soon as possible in 2021.

 

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Review of ‘The Healing Paths of Fife’

A fantasy memoir ~
Diana walked along the Fife Coastal Path

REVIEW OF ‘THE HEALING PATHS OF FIFE’

on Amazon on 9th December 2019

Here is the latest review. It is 4 stars but I’m really chuffed that Ragner took the trouble to write it:

“The first thing to note about this book is its subtitle, where Diana Jackson correctly classifies it both as a fantasy and a memoir. To start with the memoir, she describes in considerable detail the several walks in which, sometimes accompanied by her husband, she explores the Fife Coastal Path. These walks are always well observed and occasionally a little scary, for example, when she cuts it fine with the incoming tide and, more so, when she undertakes the Elie Chain Walk. To quote from Fife Council website:

‘This unique scramble will take you across hazardous coastal terrain for 0.5 km.
There are 8 chains, some vertical, with up to 10 metres height gain/loss.’

There is the occasional digression from this walk, for example to Roslyn Chapel and to her previous home in Bedfordshire. But this is to be expected. No one leads life in a totally straight line.

Moving to the fantasy element, the author meets several characters from the past, the most distant being Queen Margaret, the second wife of Malcolm Canmore, who was King of Scots in the early 11th century.

These historical characters fulfill two functions. The first is straightforward, to shed light on the times in which they lived. The second is to offer advice and encouragement to the author, who is has recently been made redundant, is in the process of moving from Bedfordshire to Fife, and who is considering turning to writing full time.

When she is walking alone, it is easy to accomplish this. But when she is travelling with her husband a degree of separation is required or the he might well begin to wonder who she is talking to. The usual solution is that they become separated for a while, one being ahead of the other on their route. The most imaginative solution, is the single occasion when the author is in two places at once.

‘When I straightened I could see my other self laughing too. I walked towards the bench where she and my husband were sitting and we gazed out to sea together, across towards Pettycur Bay on the distant horizon. As we sat, we smiled, and as we smiled we merged back into one.’

This may seem unlikely, but as the author correctly points out, ‘The wonderful thing about fiction is that anything is possible.’

Of the several such meetings in the book, two are unusual for different reasons. When she encounters Robert Louis Stevenson, she gives him more advice than he gives her. At first sight this may seem odd, till we remember that she is meeting him before his writing career gets under way.

She also meets a selkie, an altogether trickier customer than Robert Louis Stevenson.

‘I strolled towards the tower and sat on a large boulder, as close to the seals as I dare, mesmerised by their antics, until suddenly I felt a damp fishy breath, as if someone had dared to creep up on me in my reverie and brush past, his face barely inches from my own. I glanced around to find a ‘man’ settling on a rock nearby, his alluring face and deep brown eyes gazing into my own. I might have been smitten by his sensuous touch or unnerved by his audacity to invade my space, if it hadn’t been for an over-riding fishy scent which made me smile.’

The selkie is a mythical creature, best known to many through that fine song, The Great Selkie o’ Suleskerry. Like any selkie worth his salt he is trying to chat her up. Where does this get him? You’ll have to read the book to find out.”

I laughed when I read about my advice to Robert Louis Stevenson. I had no idea I’d done that!

Well over £500 has been raised for local charities. It is at present for sale in aid of Kirkcaldy Foodbank on

Amazon.co.uk 

It can be ordered at Waterstones,

but the book is also available at Baker’s Field cafe and The Olympia Arcade in Kirkcaldy.

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99c sale of Healing Paths of Fife in USA

The Healing Paths of Fife

travel memoir with a bit of fantasy

99c for one week only

Friday 17th January to 24th January.

Click on for link to Amazon:

viewbook.at/TheHealingPathsofFife

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